Molluscum Contagiosium #HealthHop

Molluscum Contagiosium

When you have had four children I think you get a general idea about whether to take your child to see a doctor or not. If it’s nothing serious then it’s usually more faff than it’s worth organising everything and everyone to get to the appointment. Then there’s a matter of will they need to miss time off school. I can now roughly tell my children’s temperature with just the use of my hand (whether it is normal or they have a fever). I have even heard talk of Doctors seeing patients over Skype in the future. One thing I was told always to be mindful of was moles changing shape or colour – that is exactly why we ended up seeing the nurse when my son had Molluscum Contagiosium.

Molluscum Contagiosium

The nurse had told us that it could go away by itself within 12-18 months and needed no treatment. However, my friend’s children had had it and she talked to my about the effects of my son’s self-esteem if people saw it on his back and commented.

Molluscum Contagiosium

She told me how easily it could spread to other parts of his body and onto my other children. I remember that her daughter had had it at the top of her legs between her thighs. She told me that because (in adults) it can be caught by sexual contact she had seen online that people had been worried about mentioning it. It can be spread by bath water, towels, flannels and soft toys, etc.

Molluscum Contagiosium

About Molluscum Contagiosium

Molluscum Contagiosium are small warty bumps on the skin that are often found in clusters or groups. Effecting any part of the body but rarely on the palms of the hands and the soles of the feet. They are about 1.5mm across and pearly-white or slightly pink. A tiny spot in the middle often develops on the top of each molluscum. It can affect anyone at any age, but mostly occurs in children ages 1-4 years old. Those with immune systems that are not working so well (such as those with AIDs, undergoing chemotherapy or having steroid treatment) are more susceptible to having them. After infection the small lumps usually take between 2-7 weeks to develop.

Molluscum Contagiosium

Typically each pot lasts 6-12 weeks. As they spread the condition can last as long as 5 years. Molluscum Contagiosium is not usually serious. If there are hundreds of them, or they are larger than normal, then it could indicate a problem with the immune system. Although contagious there is no need to stop going swimming, as the risk of passing the virus on is small, and not serious.

Molluscum Contagiosium

Our Son’s Molluscum Contagiosium

We decided to aggravate the spots and use my friend’s advice of putting cider vinegar on it (with cotton wool) and covering it with a plaster. We took photos over the days that we did this so that others could see its process. After a while my husband (he’s a good man and he did this as it REALLY hurt and our 6 year old was bravely fighting back the tears) decided that this wasn’t working well and that it looked to be getting infected. He had been squeezing the spots and we after read that this should be performed with sterile gloves on. We made the switch to TCP and allowed the spots to get air (by not using the plaster).

Molluscum Contagiosium

I think we are almost there now – and it has been about 2 weeks since we started treating them. Now my youngest two have white bumps on their hands and I am just hoping they are going to go away quickly!

Molluscum Contagiosium

whilst reading online there are a lot of different opinions on whether you should squeeze or aggravate the spots. We did a bit of both – my husband thinks he should have just squeezed them and my friend thinks he should have just aggravated them. You can see the process through the pictures. The pictures are in order but not a picture a day.

Molluscum Contagiosium

This post is not professional advice just our experiences. Please consult your doctor if you are worried or for advice.

Molluscum Contagiosium

If the spots become infected then a course of antibiotics may be required. The area that is infected may make a difference to how much it hurts to treat the spots also.
Molluscum Contagiosium

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43 thoughts on “Molluscum Contagiosium #HealthHop”

  1. Crikey, poor little guy, that doesn’t look like fun at all. Sounds like he is being very brave. I have heard that bathing in dead sea salts, and coconut oil are both good options for treatment too. Hope he is better soon x

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  2. I’ve not heard of this – will have to look it up, we have loads of medical books here! What a brave boy having to put up with the spots and the treatment too. Let’s hope it clears up quickly.

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  3. That is a new one on me, and I thought mine had put me through pretty much all of the odd skin complaints over the years! poor chap, looks painful – hope it is on the mend now xx

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  4. That doesn’t look like molluscum- all four of mine have had it. Once you make hem raw like that they scar- if that’s what they are, and the red area around them usually indicates infection. Those are going to scar pretty badly, molluscum is harmless little pyramid shapes blisters which can last 2-3 years but rarely cause problems.

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  5. I’m a total nightmare with the first sign of any spot or mark out of the ordinary. Mine haven’t have chickenpox yet and I’m constantly on the look out for spots!

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  6. Your son’s look far more uncomfortable than my son’s did. He had them for years.
    I chose the popping option but like you say you should be so careful because it’s the pearly white inside that contains the virus. I never wore gloves but always had a tissue and washed my hands immediately afterwards.
    It seemed like all of a sudden they just disappeared in the end.

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  7. Never heard of this before and it does look sore. Does it itch or is it just treating it that is painful? I really hope it clears up quickly and that he feels better soon xx

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  8. I tried to post from my phone but doesn’t seem to have got through. These don’t look like molluscum, all my kids have had it – although it may be because the pyramid shaped blisters are damaged so much that it looks different? The medical advice is never to treat or try and remove them, because that causes scarring. These look infected? The surrounding red area and the yellow insides are classic signs in localised infection – and they look so sore 🙁 My kids all had them in crops which is how they arrive – they are also one of the most common childhood diseases although many are in fact immune to the virus. My kids are all immunodeficient to varying degrees and had it for 3-5 years each! NHS online also says “Do not squeeze the spots because it can cause pain, bleeding and an increased risk of spreading the infection. It is also likely to cause scarring.”

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  9. ouch they do look sore,

    mine have had mollescum a few years back, but after reading about it and everywhere saying don’t pick – aggrivate the spots we decided to leave them, both my eldest two had very minor cases behind their knees which went away after about 6 weeks, didn’t cause them any pain or discomfort and although abit horrible to look at didn’t seem to bother them and as they were only young it was easy enough to ignore. My youngest had it worse around his groin and under his arms, His seemed to be there for much longer so we did eventually put some TCP on them, but we didn’t pick or squeeze the spots and that seemed to clear them up quickly but they may have been going anyway. again they didn’t seem to bother him (but did sting when we put TCP on!)

    It is a horrible virus and I had a friend whos little girl had the spots all over her face, which must have been stressful for her and her mum. I do think picking at the spots certainly can make them much sorer/infected but it is very tempting as its such a stubborn virus and unsightly.

    I hope your sons spots clear up really soon

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  10. Hi Joy, my middle girl has had these for about 12 mths, we got rid with neat tea tree oil on a cotton bud dabbed each one each night before bed… they soon erupted and she was able to wipe them away with tissue. Now all gone x x these pics looks so sore x

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  11. I can’t say I’ve ever heard of this before but my gosh does it look painful! Thank you for sharing your son’s experience – I’m sure you’ll be putting lots of peoples mind at ease by explaining it all!

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  12. It looks so sore. I hope it clears up quickly for your son. I have heard of the virus but have never encountered it in person. I am a picker so would find it very hard to resist squeezing.

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  13. Oh gosh poor little guy that looks so sore! It’s amazing all these skin care conditions that can come about 🙁 I hope it is better soon for him and the spots on the others don’t develop to well. x

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  14. We are (fingers crossed) right at the end of a very long bout of this with my youngest, I’d never heard of it before he came out in it. Great post though, more people need to be aware of it and not do as we did, which was spend ridiculous amounts on money de-fleaing the whole house and poor cat who didn’t even have fleas, because we assumed that it was flea bites!!

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  15. My kids have all had these, horrible, horrible things. My middle child had a really terrible case, I’m just glad she got them when she was too little to notice. I hope yours clear up soon. xx

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  16. Aren’t they SOOOO annoying?! I find that it just takes a LOT of patience. I have gotten those larger wet suit type things for swimming for the kids when they have had them, but actually I think that air and sun helps them on their way a bit quicker. We haven’t messed with them and just let them take their LONG course. Of course, I was on many false alarms for chicken pox. Funny how this isn’t something that you hear much about between parents, but it’s very common.

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  17. And making sure that clothes, pjs and towels are changed after every use and washed at 60. And showering regularly rather than baths helps.

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